Gaucho Insert - Long Island, NY

We get to see the pre-install view with this beautiful Gaucho & brasero insert from Long Island, NY. 

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Gaucho Grande - Georgia

This week we have another awesome installation from Georgia - a Gaucho Grande insert with a left hand crank wheel. Are you a lefty? Just choose the option at check out, as simple as that! 

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Gaucho Insert - Georgia

We love this unique install out of Georgia - A Gaucho Insert flange mounted into a countertop! 

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Grilled Lobster Tails with Browned Butter

Grilled Lobster Tails with Browned Butter

Serves 2

4 tablespoons salted butter, softened
1 tablespoon thinly sliced chives
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest; plus lemon wedges for serving
1 medium clove garlic, minced
1 large russet potato, sliced in ¼” rounds
1 small head broccoli, cut into long spears
Canola oil for grilling
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 6- to 7-oz. lobster tails, thawed if frozen

1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter until the milk solids begin to brown
and the butter looks golden and smells nutty, about 7 minutes. Pour the golden butter into a
small bowl and stir in the chives, lemon zest, and garlic. Set aside.

2. Place the potato rounds in a microwave safe bowl with 1 cup water and microwave on high
until tender, about 6 minutes. Drain and toss with canola oil, salt, and pepper. Toss the broccoli
spears with canola oil, salt, and pepper.

3. Prepare the grill for medium high cooking. Spread the potato slices and broccoli over the grill in a single layer. Grill until grill marks form and the broccoli chars lightly, about 8 minutes.

4. Using kitchen shears, cut along the center of the back of the lobster tails from the opening to the tail fin. Turn the tail over and repeat the same cut on the bottom; use a knife to cut through the meat to create two halves. Clean out the intestinal tract, if present.

5. Place the tails, shell side up, on the grill. Grill until the meat of the tails is lightly marked, about 3 minutes. Flip and brush with a little of the brown butter and grill until the lobster meat is firm, moist, and opaque, 2 to 3 minutes more. Remove from the grill and serve with the potatoes and broccoli and the brown butter.

Grilled Hot Wings - In time for Superbowl LII

Grilled Hot Wings

Serves 2

2 lb chicken wings, separated into wings and drumettes
Canola oil for grilling
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. Place a steamer basket inside of a large pot with 1 inch of water. Bring to a
simmer over medium-high heat. Add chicken to the steamer basket, cover and
cook for 10 minutes.
2. Prepare grill for medium high cooking.
3. Remove the wings from the steamer basket and toss with 2 tablespoons canola
oil and a generous pinch of salt and pepper. Grill until golden brown and crisp,
about 10 minutes.
4. Transfer the wings to a large bowl and toss in your sauce of choice and serve.

3 sauces:

Cuban Mojo

½ cup extra virgin olive oil
¼ cup lemon juice
¼ cup minced garlic
½ small red onion, thinly sliced
Combine the ingredients in a small saucepan and cook over low heat until the
garlic and onions are soft, about 10 minutes.

Mango Habanero

1 cup mango nectar
1/3 cup honey
¼ cup habanero hot sauce

Combine the ingredients in a small saucepan and cook over medium heat until
syrupy, about 15 minutes.

Mexican Bufalo Salsa

1/3 cup Mexican style hot sauce, such as Cholula
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
2 tablespoons lime juice
In a bowl, whisk together all the ingredients until emulsified.

Gaucho Grande Insert - Connecticut

This Gaucho Grande (plus brasero) was installed in a beautiful home in Connecticut. Check out that full fire brick surround! 

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Garlic Lime Shrimp Skewers over Tex Mex Quinoa Salad

Garlic Lime Shrimp Skewers over Tex Mex Quinoa Salad

Garlic Lime Shrimp Skewers over Tex Mex Quinoa Salad

Serves 2

½ cup white quinoa, rinsed
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 limes, 1 zested to yield 1 teaspoon and juiced to yield 3 tablespoons, the other cut into wedges
1 teaspoon chopped chipotle chiles in adobo
3 cloves garlic, mashed to a paste
½ teaspoon ground cumin
¼ teaspoon dried oregano
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup rinsed and drained no-salt- added black beans
½ cup finely diced red bell pepper
2 ears corn on the cob
3 scallions
Canola oil for grilling
1 tablespoon finely chopped cilantro
½ pound jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined
4 wooden skewers, soaked in water for 30 minutes

1. Cook the quinoa according to package directions. In a jar with a lid, combine the oil, lime
juice, ⅓ of garlic paste, cumin, oregano, a pinch of salt, and a few grinds of pepper and shake until combined.

2. In a large bowl, toss together the cooked quinoa, beans, bell pepper, and dressing. Let the salad sit to meld the flavors while you prepare the corn, scallions, and shrimp.

3. Prepare the grill for medium high heat.

4. Coat the corn and scallions with 1 tablespoon canola oil and grill, turning occasionally, until charred all over, about 8 minutes for the corn, 3 minutes for the scallions. Let sit until cool enough to handle. Cut the corn off the cob and chop the scallions. Toss with the salad.

5. In a large bowl, stir together 2 tablespoons canola oil, the remaining garlic paste, the lime zest, cilantro, and a big pinch of salt and pepper. Add the shrimp to coat. Skewer the shrimp with 2 skewers, one in the front and one in the back to keep the shrimp from curling. Grill, flipping once, until bright pink and opaque, about 8 minutes.

6. Remove the shrimp from the grill and immediately squeeze lime juice all over them. Divide the quinoa salad and shrimp between 2 plates and serve.

Custom Insert - Texas

Check out this gorgeous (and unique!) grill installation in Texas. The owners had an existing fireplace, so rather than demolish and rebuild, we helped them out with a custom sized grill insert, with a brasero to match! 

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Gaucho Insert - Ontario, Canada

All the way from Ontario, Canada, we have this awesome Gaucho installation. This beautiful set up features a brasero and rotisserie options, plus a thru-wall extension, so the owner can control everything with ease! 

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Gaucho Insert - upstate New York

Check out this beautiful indoor installation of a Gaucho Insert in a custom built indoor kitchen/cooking area. Look at all that wood!

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Bannock - Traditional Campfire Bread

Try out this tasty and fun traditional campfire bread, just in time for the holidays! 

Bannock- Campfire Bread
Serves 8 to 10

3 cups all-purpose flour
⅓ cup brown sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp ground ginger
½ tsp ground cinnamon
¼ tsp ground all spice
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
⅛ tsp ground cloves
½ tsp. kosher salt
2 Tbsp. canola oil
1 cup water; more as needed

In a large bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, and salt. Work in the oil until well combined. Slowly add the water until a thick, sticky dough forms, adding more water as needed 1 Tbsp. at a time.
Roll the dough into a ball and pat down until 1 inch thick and about 6 inches in diameter. Place on oiled griddle pan. Cook, flipping occasionally, until a thick crust forms all over and there are dark spots on the surface, about 20 minutes. 

Basting Meat with Salmuera in Argentine Cooking

Basting Meat with Salmuera in Argentine Cooking

When we talk about Argentine cooking on this blog, we often make the point that there isn’t a lot of seasoning in play in many of the recipes we share.

Often, the only spice at work in these dishes is the most basic and essential one there is: salt.

Today, we’re going to look at a new element of Argentine cooking called salmuera. Salmuera simply means “brine,” or a highly-concentrated solution of salt in water. Unlike regular salt, this brine won’t toughen your meats.

Tips for Grilling Fish on Your Gaucho Grill

Tips for Grilling Fish on Your Gaucho Grill

Compared to sausage, steaks and chicken, fish can seem like a minor league player trying to compete against a team of all-stars.

And yes, flounder cooked in a pan in your kitchen is no match for a nice thick steak at a backyard barbecue. But put fish on your Gaucho Grill, and all bets are off. Grilling brings out the best in fish. Here are a few tips to get started.

Tips for Asado Grilling Over Wood Embers

Tips for Asado Grilling Over Wood Embers

We got our company’s name from the gauchos, rough-and-tumble Argentinian cattlemen who cooked their meat on makeshift grills. And while we weren’t on hand for those long-ago Latin barbecue celebrations, we’d say it’s a safe bet the gauchos didn’t head out to Home Depot to buy charcoal. They cooked over wood.

They had the right idea. Wood smoke gives your food an amazing flavor, but it’s also something of a challenge, writes Oliver Schwaner-Albright in The New York Times.

“Grilling over a wood fire is as much a sport as an art — it’s more instinctive than cooking with a gas grill, more nuanced than cooking with charcoal, and more athletic than both.”

If you think this is something you’re ready to tackle, here are some rules to follow for your next Latin barbecue:

Drink Pairings for Your Next Asado Meal

Drink Pairings for Your Next Asado Meal

Regardless of whether you’ve ever visited Argentina, there’s a good chance you’re nevertheless aware of just how significant a role the consumption of meat plays in the country’s culinary culture. What you may not be familiar with, however, is the enormous popularity of a particularly Argentine style of barbecuing.

Known as an asado, it’s an hours-long outdoor cookout that isn’t entirely unlike an American barbecue experience. Still, there are several significant differences, not the least of which is the food and drink itself. At an asado meal, you can expect to enjoy high-quality cuts of meat ranging from sirloin and flank steaks to a succulent rack of ribs. Sausage, chicken, and even carefully prepared appetizers known as achuras may also make an appearance.

Another significant difference between the American-style barbecues you and I are used to and an asado cookout is the beverage of choice. Cans of beer and pitchers of sweet iced tea aren’t generally a part of an Argentine barbecue. Instead, you can expect to encounter red wine—and lots of it—in varying degrees of quality.

If you’d like to host a genuine asado meal of your own, keep reading to learn which wines you’ll want to pair with which meats.

Tips for Cleaning Your Pink Himalayan Salt Block

Tips for Cleaning Your Pink Himalayan Salt Block

Even if you know almost nothing at all about grilling or cooking, you’re probably still aware that the world of cuisine is a world of trends. Whether they’re short-lived fads or decades-long movements, there seems to always be something trendy on offer to engage and inspire the zealous gourmand.

One of the more popular cooking trends today involves grilling or otherwise preparing food with something known as a Himalayan salt block. Most Himalayan salt blocks are about two inches thick and roughly the length and width of a trade paperback book. And although they’re sometimes used for serving, these unusual grill salt blocks, as we like to call them, are more commonly used for cooking meats, fish, and vegetables. The blocks add a complex salt flavor to food, although juices and food debris tend to build up easily and stick stubbornly to the blocks when they’re used for cooking. Visit our blog for more tips on cooking with pink Himalayan salt blocks.

Because these blocks are literally made of salt, there are number of very important dos and don’ts to bear in mind where cleaning is concerned. The following tips will ensure that your grill salt block, which is surprisingly delicate, won’t become ruined because of cleaning.

Uses for Leftover Beef After Your Asado Cookout

Uses for Leftover Beef After Your Asado Cookout

The cook out is winding down. Your asado grill is cooling, guests have moved onto drinks and desserts, and you’re thinking about leftovers.

Specifically, the leftover beef. Cooking beef on an asado grill can give you steaks like nothing else you’ve tasted, but that doesn’t mean your leftovers need to be a letdown.

Here are a few Argentine-tinged beef dishes that you can make with whatever beef is leftover from your next cookout.

Meat Cutting Techniques & Tips

Meat Cutting Techniques & Tips

We’ve designed our Argentine grills to give you perfectly cooked cuts of meat. What you do with that meat after it leaves the grill is up to you. The way you cut a steak after it’s cooked plays as much of a role in your meal as the grilling process.

When you’ve taken the time to grill a nice piece of beef on your parrilla, you want to make sure that you take the proper steps to serve it correctly. Here are a meat cutting techniques and tips that will allow you to get the most out of your next meal.